Wednesday, October 26, 2016

The Other's World: Refugees (Part One)

Irina is the daughter of a very good friend of mine. I saw her growing up and become a wonderful woman, full of energy and willingness to help others.
From time to time (whenever her working schedule allows it) she is off to foreign lands to help others. Her heart especially beats for kids (she works as a care taker for small children when she's at home).
She has been to Africa last year as a volunteer and this year she decided to give her time (and her heart) to the people of a refugee camp near Katerini, Greece. I admire her courage and her big heart!
When I read her interview of one of the refugees (she's done it for the association she went to Greece with), I decided that Sammy's (the refugee) words would be perfect for my blog (part two of this post).
In addition, I asked Irina some questions about her experience in Greece.
You'll find the German version of the interview at the bottom.

The Other's World: Refugees (Part Two)

INTERVIEW WITH SAMMY, 21 YEARS OLD, from Shengal, Syria
Interviewed by Irina
(for the German version as well as some pictures, please klick on
https://www.facebook.com/notes/borderfree-association/sorgen-wegtanzen-mit-sammy/1485906041426722)

Who is Sammy? He is a Syrian refugee and lives at Camp Petra in Greece. He gives dancing lessons to the kids of the camp. Not only that though. He speaks up for the people in the camp. He helps out whenever and wherever he can. He built a shower for a woman who couldn't leave her tent due to her paralysis for example. Or he built craddles out of wood.


Sammy, please tell us your story.
I've been to Camp Petra for 4 months now. I haven't had a real home for a long time. I grew up in the suburbs of Shengal. The IS was only 15 minutes away from our village. We saw awful scenes on TV. We saw how they killed people. The whole village fled. It was awful. We also packed what little we possesed and left our village. We ended up in Turkey where I got to stay for 2 years. Afterwards I was sent to Idomeni in a refugee camp. Now I am in Camp Petra and I actually feel lucky. Not everybody has been, unfortunately.


Tell us something about your childhood.
I haven't had a nice childhood. My family was very poor and we didn't have any money. I didn't even have clothes of my own. I had to borrow some from my friends. Other kids were laughing at me. From an early age, we struggled to survive.



Now in Camp Petra you teach kids how to dance. For many of them you are a role model. Where did you learn to dance?
I taught myself everything. I never attended a class. There wouldn't have been any money for it. I watched the videos on YouTube and tried to imitate the moves. 


Where do you get the energy to get up every day?
I see how dancing gives the kids a sense in their everyday life. They are so young and they already have experienced so much. Dancing ought to give them back something. The kids learn how to externalize bad feelings and it helps them to process emotional and mental pain. When I look at the kids while they dance, I am happy. I want to do everything to allow them a better future. I am always there for them. 24 hours a day.
  
Which is your wish for the people that live here?
I wish for all these families to be united again and to be able to live in a secure and peaceful place. I wish for a future for these people. This isn't only my wish. It's the wish of everybody here!


And what about your very personal wish?
My personal  wishes are unimportant. I wish for the wishes of these kids here to come true. At that moment my biggest wish will have come true as well.


Is there something else you want to add?
I want to thank the organizations like Borderfree. You allow me to do what I do with the kids. We need your help. The wood I got to built the craddle, for example. And all the other stuff that you provided. I am very thankful for all that!

Sunday, October 23, 2016

Tuesday, October 18, 2016

Perfect Moment

Feeling a Little Blue

Do you ever feel a little blue? I do, not so often, thankfully, but I still do. Like yesterday, for instance. No apparent reason.
Just feeling a little blue.
I didn't dwell on it too much though. I accept that there are days and then there are other days.
My coping mechanisms have changed over the years, I just realized yesterday! A couple of years ago, during an "I feel blue" day like yesterday, I would have:
  • gone shopping or
  • eaten my way through my fridge or
  • talked about "it" over and over and over again, hoping to feel better.
Until I realized that all that was of no help because
a) shopping was no good for my budget (and while feeling blue one should never ever ever try on some pants in a badly lit dressing room! Obviously on one of these days EVERYTHING made me look fat and ugly and whatever you can think of. SMILE Therefore, not only bad for my bank account but also for my self-esteem!).

b) Eating only helped for a short time. Getting fatter though was no good for my mood on the long term (which is worse than feeling a little blue for one day!).

c) Talking wasn't helping either because, honestly, most of the times I don't even know WHY I feel the way I feel on one of these days. Therefore, talking is just useless. On the contrary, it often made me feel worse because it became bigger than it really was.

So, what do I do these days when I feel a little blue?
Nothing.
I let it go by.
I go on doing what I usually do and wait it out.
Experience has shown me that it goes away.
I accepted that feeling blue from time to time is part of life.
It'd be different if I'd feel blue several days a month. Then I'd probably talk to someone about it. But just a couple of days a year? No big deal.

Saturday, October 15, 2016

Friday, October 7, 2016

Bye Bye Summer!

I was on Pinterest, scrolling through the pins, when I read the above words. Exactly my thoughts!
I don't know how the weather is where you're from, but in Switzerland we went from very nice (late) summer weather with nice temperatures ... to autumn (I'd almost say winter) temperatures from almost one day to the other.

A shock. Each year it's a shock. EACH YEAR. You'd think that I'd be used to this (not living in Hawaii or elsewhere where the weather is always nice and warm ... oh my, don't make me think about it! I'll start crying!), but no, I actually am not. Not at all.
What can I do though (besides moving to a warmer place hahaha)? Nothing. Just wearing warm clothes again (and it's harder this year because I still have tanned feet and arms - it's a pity to hide them!!). Spending evenings at home, wearing socks and warm sweaters. Hoping for this mood to move on (it always moves on - luckily for me .. and for you haha).
SIGH

Saturday, October 1, 2016

Capturing Perfect Moments

was just thinking (Help us! She's thinking again haha!!). I just posted this picture on Instagram with the hashtag #perfectmoments
So I thought, why not starting a new series of pictures of perfect every day moments?
This is the first picture. Taken near from where I live. Let me think about this idea of mine a bit more. And let me look for #perfect moments.
Why not? I'm a strong believer of enjoying the small wonderful moments of life. This serie would match well with my believe, don't you think?
I'll keep you updated!